10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

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10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

10. Kai Ken

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

The Kai Ken (also called Tiger Dog ) is considered the oldest and rarest dog breed in Japan.

The Kai Ken is native to wild mountain dogs in the remote Kai district and has been used as a hunting dog for most of its history. The breed was not recognized in Japan until 1931 and was unknown in the United States until the early 1990s. In 1934 Kai Ken received national treasure status in Japan and is now protected by law.

As a hunting breed, the Kai Ken is very intelligent, athletic, healthy, and independent. They break easily and are fairly easy to train, although they require a steady hand and good socialization from birth. They make good indoor dogs, happy to live in an apartment as long as they walk around the park enough.

However, the Kai ken needs to be kept on a leash, otherwise their strong hunter instinct will take over and drag them into a prey chase.


9. Kooikerhondje

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF


These small spaniel-type dogs originating in the Netherlands were popular in the 17th and 18th centuries (as evidenced by their presence in the paintings of Rembrandt and other masters), but they were on the verge of extinction after World War II.

The Kooikerhondje has been saved and is gaining recognition again, although the breed is not yet recognized in the United States or Canada.

The Kooikerhondje has a reputation for being well-mannered, calm, and loyal as They tend to be reserved with strangers, but become friendly and affectionate once they have come close to someone. They are quite energetic dogs, so it is better that they have plenty of space to run, such as a fenced yard. Warning: as the breed has a relatively small genetic pool, it is prone to certain hereditary diseases, including von Willebrand disease, hereditary necrotizing myelopathy (NMS), and eye diseases.

8. Löwchen

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

At one point, the little lion dog had the dubious pleasure of bearing the title of the rarest breed of dog in the world: in 1971, there were only 65 registered breeds. Nevertheless, the history of the breed could go back as far as the 15th century. Small lion dogs, companions of the rich and elite, appear in many Paintings and literary works of the Renaissance.

The Lawchen is a large pet: friendly, playful and intelligent and, unlike many other breeds of pet dogs, it is not known to be a barker. He needs affection and may suffer from separation anxiety if left alone for a long time. They are also good with children and make excellent pets – it’s a shame that this breed is practically unknown.

7. Norwegian Lundehund

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

e Norwegian Lundehund is a small breed of Spitz dog native to Norway. As early as the 16th century, these dogs were used to hunt puffins along the Norwegian coast. However, interest in this breed has faded with the introduction of new hunting methods. At one point, only six Lundehunds remained, but thanks to careful breeding, the population gradually increased to 1,400 dogs (in 2010).

The Lundehund is separated by two distinctive features from the other dogs: six toes on the legs instead of the usual four, and greater flexibility of the joints, both of which make him an excellent cliff climber. In fact, the joints are so flexible that the Lundehund has the frightening ability to tilt its head backwards until it touches the spine. When it comes to temperament, they are brave, energetic and stubborn. In terms of health, the Lundehunds have few problems, but some suffer from digestive disorders.

6. Skye Terrier

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

This adorable hairball comes from Scotland (Isle of Skye). There was a time when this breed was extremely popular with the British nobility: Queen Victoria, in particular, was very fond of it. From there, the popularity of the Skye terrier spread throughout the island, and in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it seemed that the breed was becoming a universal favorite. However, this never really happened and the interest gradually faded. Currently, the Skye terrier is considered an endangered breed that could well die out within 40 years.

Rather courageous, loyal and curious, the Skye terrier is ideal for adult owners. Its silky coat needs to be combed regularly, but otherwise it is relatively easy to maintain. Like many short-legged dogs, they might suffer from degenerative disc disease. Avoid jumping, climbing and even long walks during the first 8 to 10 months of a Skye terrier’s life, as active exercise can damage bone growth and cause problems later on.

5. Picard Shepherd

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

These adorable dogs with a dilapidated appearance are very rare, even in France, where they have lived since the 9th century AD. Because of their appearance as sheepdogs, the Picards never managed to win the hearts of nobles and almost disappeared after the two world wars. Today, there are only about 3,500 of these dogs in France (and 400 in total in North America).

The Picard Shepherd is a lively and intelligent dog, with a tendency to obstinacy that necessitates formal training in obedience. It is a herd dog by nature, and a good watchdog because of its developed protective instinct. If not exercised regularly, these puppies may engage in destructive behaviour out of sheer boredom, but they are generally calm and of a gentle temperament. The Picard Shepherd is a healthy breed, although hip dysplasia can be a problem.

3. Kuvasz

There are only a few known breeds of dogs whose history can be reliably traced beyond the 9th century; Kuvasz is one of them. The history of the breed goes back to the Magyar tribes who conquered the territory of modern Hungary in 896 AD, bringing with them their cattle-keeping dogs. The Kuvasz was a popular breed in medieval Hungary and remained famous throughout the country’s history. However, during World War II, the breed was almost completely exterminated because of its reputation as a fierce protector. According to various sources, only twelve to thirty dogs in the whole country survived the war. This severely limited the breeding pool, so that the modern Kuvasz common likely has some genetic traces of other breeds that have been used to rebuild it.

The Kuvasz is an intelligent and independent dog, so it is only suitable for experienced owners. Obedience training is necessary for this breed.

2. Lagotto Romagnolo

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

Another breed of dog ancient and rare, this time originating from Italy. Its name literally means “Romagna lake dog” (Romagna is a district in Italy), and its traditional purpose is a water search dog. It is thought that many modern breeds of lake dog descend in part from the Lagotto Romagnolo. Currently, however, the breed is mainly used as a truffle search dog.

Lagottos are active and faithful dogs, although not all are good domestic companions. They have a fairly long lifespan of about 16 years, but may suffer from hip dysplasia and epilepsy related to poor rearing.

2. Eurasier

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

Unlike most of the others on this list, this one is a new kind. She was born in Germany in 1960 when a group of followers set out to create a breed with the best qualities of Chow Chow and Wolfspitz. The resulting “Wolf-Chow” was then crossed with the Samoyed and renamed Eurasier.

The Eurasier is a quiet and quiet dog, dignified and very faithful. They are reserved for strangers and very attached to their family, which is why all training must be done by a family member and not by an outside master. One important thing to remember is that they are pet dogs. They must stay close to their human and will not be happy chained, living in a kennel or used as a watchdog.

1. Glen of Imaal Terrier

10 BREEDS OF RARE DOGS YOU MAY NEVER HAVE HEARD OF

The Glen of Imaal Terrier is a very rare breed of dog. there are currently only a few hundred registered in the United States. An interesting fact is that, according to DNA analysis, the Glen of Imaal Terrier is more closely related to Molossers (bulldog/mastiff/boxer dogs) than to other burrows.

Like all burrows, the Glens are energetic, stubborn and fearless. Unlike most burrows, they are not barkers. They are intelligent and learn quickly, especially if they are led by a firm hand. The Glens are good with people, although they can be aggressive towards other dogs. A known health problem is progressive atrophy of the retina, a condition that gradually leads to blindness.